Emergency Information

Before We Arrive

 

  • If at night, turn on an outside porch light. If possible, send someone to the front lawn with a flashlight to signal the ambulance driver.
  • Clear a path inside your home. Move all furniture or TV’s out of the way.
  • Place dogs or cats in a separate room and close the door.
  • Gather all medication the patient has been prescribed.
  • Do not give the patient anything to drink.
  • Keep talking to the patient.

 

Display Your Street Address

If you call for help, we need to find your house easily. Please help us by making sure your house number is easily seen from the street and visible at night. We can’t help you if we can’t find you!

 

Plan for an Emergency

Record family medical information on a card and keep it close to the telephone in case of an emergency.
This should include:

  • Dial 911
  • Say, “This is an emergency. I need an ambulance because …”
  • Give the location, age and symptom of the patient. Also include your own name and phone number.
  • Follow the instructions of the dispatcher.
  • Stay with the patient until EMS arrives.

 

What to Do If You Have an Emergency

Record family medical information on a card and keep it close to the telephone in case of an emergency.
This should include:

  • Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Drug Allergies
  • Medical History
  • Current Medications

 

Pull Over and Stop for Blue Lights

Many volunteer EMS personnel and firefighters use blue lights on their vehicles to quickly and safely answer your call. New Jersey Motor Vehicle Law requires that all drivers (in both directions) immediately pull to the right and stop when any vehicle displaying a blue light is approaching.

 

Bicycle Helmets are Required

All children 14 years and younger are required by law to wear approved bicycle helmets. Helmets help save lives of children and adults of all ages.

 

Wear Your Seat Belts

Not only is it the law, but we see dramatic evidence every day that they save lives and reduce injuries. In addition, do not talk on your cell phone while driving, even with a headset. Pull onto the shoulder of the road to make your phone call.